Most pastors have no clue what percentage of the men they lead are using porn, or what the divorce rate is among married couples in their church, or…

Most pastors have no clue what percentage of the men they lead are using porn, or what the divorce rate is among married couples in their church, or how many in the church are addicted to drugs, cigarettes, violent video games, alcohol, gambling, etc. but DO know exactly what their attendance was last Sunday.
Because we measure what matters to us.
We have a discipleship problem for a very simple reason – we’ve equated numerical growth with success, and relegated the very mission and purpose of the church to secondary (at best) status. The modern, western church is, for the most part, prayerless, powerless, biblically illiterate, and indistinguishable from the world in our lifestyle. We’ve become solely defined by grace, because that’s all we’re comfortable proclaiming. Only when we repent of the heresy of “Go ye therefore and grow the church”, and commit ourselves to becoming remade in the image of Christ (rather than just admiring Him), will we see the kind of radical transformation Jesus promised us.

30 thoughts on “Most pastors have no clue what percentage of the men they lead are using porn, or what the divorce rate is among married couples in their church, or…”

  1. So true and sad not to even mention run Bible studies and are on worship teams no wonder there is no conviction of sin when they have been accepted without and idolized by others who don’t know the real them wolves in sheeps clothing

  2. I agree in part but don’t agree with category that most are walking that plank. There are many pastors that have the heartbeat of there church and issues they are facing!

  3. Pastor, I don’t think most pastors are bad pastors, or are unconcerned about the issues in their churches, just that most have been negatively influenced by the church culture around them, and the expectations of others. I still contend that most pastors could give far more accurate data concerning Sunday attendance, than about the other issues I mentioned.

  4. Brothers, I don’t know who is right on these issues. But tonight, I am compelled to worry less about “most pastors” and focus on what I know are my personal issues. It seems that the Lord has me in a season of inspection and introspection. He is dealing with me on the log in my eye right now. Love you guys!

  5. I know I can be blunt, but if I thought most pastors were not people of good will I probably wouldn’t have written anything… I’m convinced most leaders ARE genuinely interested in pleasing God, it’s just that we tell them that doing so is measured in terms of the numbers they run. That’s the sin I’m calling out. On another note, I’m blown away by leaders like Bishop Whitter who are readily transparent regarding their own defects. These are the kind of leaders that change can come through.

  6. I apologize if the post came across as being directed towards pastors. If you re-read it you’ll see that wasn’t where the arrow was pointed. The intent was to call out a sin that I believe is affecting the church in a big way. So much so that many great men and women – who are doing the work of the Lord and making disciples – are being made to feel insignificant and unimportant. At the same time I’m not naive; there are also some (as Jesus said there would be) who are producing no real fruit, who believe they’re a voice to be reckoned with simply because they are able to draw a crowd. You’re thoughts are as mine – the disciples produced by the church are the only genuine measure of our success.

  7. In my opinion, you are handling this topic well. It is sensitive but the results are, I am digging deeper into my true motivations.

  8. Guys, I am guessing that by noon, most of the Pastors in IL will chime in with their version of my list of defects. ?

  9. It definitely is a majority of denominations and clergy. Go to most Church websites or visit many local churches and you discover this is the norm not exception. Must continue to titillate the attendees for continued support and offer accolade after accolade in an attempt to win their approval. It’s either bread or circus or bread and circus. Most clergy are hirelings, hired hands, with no heart for ministry and no real calling from God.

  10. The making of disciples prescribed by Jesus is ongoing, baptizing and teaching. The mandate is to make disciples, agreed, but you cannot do that without putting people in your circle of influence, whether that is at a coffee shop or in your pews. (I drink a lot of coffee with people?)So yes, attendance is on my mind….constantly. Whether it’s a one on one through the week or at church on Sunday morning it screams, “I have an opportunity to influence them right now!”Metrics are necessary for the process and progress. The local church’s program cannot and must not end at “Celebrate Recovery.”Perhaps some pastors are more gifted in one area than another but the end goal of any church strategy should not ever be anything less than the MULTIPLICATION of disciples. We MUST put people in our pews. How can we not be concerned with the metrics?

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